Trust in Fact – Oswald Chambers

Another golden nugget from my dear friend who is enjoying the unspeakable joys of heaven!  Can’t wait to meet him!

220px-OswaldChambersIt is not easy to say that God is love when everything that happens actually gives the lie to it.  Everyone’s soul represents some kind of battlefield.  The point for each one is whether we will hang in , as Job did, and say “Though things look black, I will trust in God.”

It is very easy to trust in God when there is no difficulty, but that is not trust at all, it is simply letting the mind rest in a complacent mood; but when there is sickness in the house, when there is trouble, when there is death, where is our trust in God?

God has to deal with us on the death side as well as on the life side.  It is all very well to know in theory that there are things we must not trust in, but another thing to know it in fact.  When God deals with us on the Nathan's anniversary breakfastdeath side He puts the sentence of death on everything we should not trust in, and we have a miserable time until we learn never anymore to trust in it, never anymore to look anywhere else than to God.  It sometimes happens that hardly a day passes without God saying, “Don’t trust, there, that is dead.”

Room for the Impossible

It never ceases to amaze me how words written a hundred years ago can be so timely for us today!  Oswald Chambers died in 1917, at the age of forty-three, yet his words ring true in 2015!

Here is an excerpt from his Devotional Bible:

Jesus is not in the sitting by the tomb; He is not in the bitter tears; He is not in the sad communings.  The place where we will find Jesus is just where common sense says it is impossible to find Him.  It was no use for the disciples to imagine they were going to have a recurrence of those three years; it was impossible to recall the thrilling yesterdays; it was impossible for the two on the way to Emmaus to have a return of the fellowship they yearned for; but there was something infinitely better for them.  “For He is risen, as He said.” Impossibility had wedded itself to what Jesus had said.  The proclamation of the impossible springs from the supernatural, not from common sense.  The supernatural figures largely all through the life of our Lord.  At His birth the angels proclaimed that He should be called Jesus “for He will save His people from their sins.”  We shall not think of our Lord as a savior if we look at Him in the light of our own minds, because no natural man imagines he needs to be saved.  Do we make room in our faith for the impossible along the line of the supernatural?  Or have we reduced our religion to such common sense platitudes that there is no need for Jesus to have lived at all?

It’s deep, but it’s worth reading several times to get it!  Beyond Common Sense–this was one of the devotionals that prompted the new name.  Can we really live this way?  Can we expect God to do the impossible?  Jesus reminds his disciples in John 14:12 that their works would exceed His works in greatness: Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do; because I go unto my Father.

And Matthew Henry has this to say about the passage.  Again, it may be deep, but it’s worth the digging.!

That they should do greater works than these. In the kingdom of nature they should work greater miracles. No miracle is little, but some to our apprehension seem greater than others. Christ had healed with the hem of his garment, but Peter with his shadow (Acts 5:15), Paul by the handkerchief that had touched him, Acts 19:12. Christ wrought miracles for two or three years in one country, but his followers wrought miracles in his name for many ages in divers countries. You shall do greater works, if there be occasion, for the glory of God. Theprayer of faith, if at any time it had been necessary, would have removed mountains. [2.] In the kingdom of grace. They should obtain greater victories by the gospel than had been obtained while Christ was upon earth. The truth is, the captivating of so great a part of the world to Christ, under such outward disadvantages, was the miracle of all. I think this refers especially to the gift of tongues;this was the immediate effect of the pouring out of the Spirit, which was a constant miracle upon the mind, in which words are framed, and which was made to serve so glorious an intention as that of spreading the gospel to all nations in their own language. This was a greater sign to them that believed not (1 Co. 14:22), and more powerful for their conviction, than any other miracle whatever.

Show this world the impossible: a life totally committed to Jesus Christ!  You will shine brightly in this dark, sin-cursed world which seems to deny its Maker more and more every year!  And remember: God is just  as faithful in 2015 as He was in the 1600s and 1900s!

One of God’s Great Don’ts

Once again, this morning’s devotionID-100263578 from Oswald Chamber’s Devotional Bible was a great blessing and challenge!  Dig in!  It’s short, so you can read it a couple times!! 🙂

It is one thing to say “Fret not,” but a very different thing to have such a disposition that you find yourself able not to fret.  It sounds so easy to talk about “resting in the Lord” and “waiting patiently for Him” until the nest is upset—until we live, as so many are doing, in tumult and anguish; is it possible to rest in the Lord?  If this IMG_0085“don’t” does not work there, it will work nowhere.  This “don’t” must work in days of perplexity as well as in days of peace, or it never will work.  And if it will not work in your particular case, it will not work in anyone else’s case.  Resting in the Lord does not depend on external circumstances at all, but on your relationship to God Himself…

Fretting springs from a determination to get our own way. Our Lord never worried and He was never anxious, because He was not “out” to realize His own ideas; He was “out” to realize God’s ideas.  Fretting is wicked if you are a child of God.

Have you been bolstering up that stupid soul of yours with the idea that your circumstances are too much for God?  Put all “supposing” on one side and dwell in the shadow of the Almighty. Deliberately tell God that you will not fret about that thing.  All our fret and worry is caused by calculating without God.

 Cease from anger, and forsake wrath: fret not thyself in any wise to do evil.

Psalm 37:8

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Walking on Dry Land

oswald chambersOswald Chambers (1874-1917) is best known for his classic devotional My Utmost for His Highest; however, The Oswald Chambers Daily Devotional Bible also contains many wonderful nuggets from his lesser known writings.

Although written nearly one hundred years ago, the following selection is certainly timely and quite challenging.  Like much of his writings, you may need to read it more than once to get the gist of what he is saying, but it is worth the extra digging!

                                     

And he said, Come.  And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus.     Matthew 14:29

Passionate, genuine affection for Jesus will lead to all sorts of vows and promises which it is impossible to fulfill.  It is an attitude of mind and heart that sees only the heroic.  We are called to be unobtrusive disciples, not heroes.  When we are right with God, the tiniest thing done out of love to Him is more precious to Him than any eloquent preaching of a sermon…We all have a lurking desire to be exhibitions for God, to be put, as it were, in His showroom.  Jesus does not want us to be specimens, He wants us to be so taken up will Him that we never think about ourselves, and the only impression left on others by our life is that Jesus Christ is having unhindered way.

Walking on water is easy to impulsive pluck, but walking on dry land as a disciple of Jesus Christ is different.  Peter walked on the water to go to Jesus, to stand crises; human nature and our pride will do it.  We can buck up and face the music of a crisis magnificently, but it does require the supernatural drudgery as a saint, to go through poverty as a saint, to go through an ordinary, unobtrusive, ignored existence as a saint, unnoticed and unnoticeable.  The “show business,” which is so incorporated into our view of Christian work today, has caused us to drift far from our Lord’s conception of discipleship.  It is instilled in us to think that we have to do exceptional things for God; we have not.  We have to be exceptional in ordinary things, to be holy in mean streets, among mean people, surrounded by sordid sinners.  That is not learned in five minutes.  (So Send I You,  Oswald Chambers. 1930)